Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Anti-torture’ Category

Justice for Peace Foundation (JPF)
Amnesty International Thailand
Union for Civil Liberties (UCL)
Cross Cultural Foundation (CrCF)

Released on 19 Dec 2014

Press Release

On 19 December 2014, the Justice for Peace Foundation (JPF), the Amnesty International Thailand, the Union for Civil Liberties (UCL), and the Cross Cultural Foundation (CrCF) have jointly proposed recommendations to the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Justice and the Director General of the Rights and Liberties Protection Department regarding the Draft Prevention and Suppression of Torture and Enforced Disappearance Act B.E….., an attempt to ensure that Thailand’s domestic laws are made in compliance with its international obligations. Through this draft law will realize that, both torture and enforced disappearance are to be criminalized as a serious human rights violation and punishment is provided proportionately to the gravity of the offence. The next reviewing session on the Bill is going to be organized by the Ministry of Justice on 22 December.

The recommendations have determined from a public discussion held to review the Bill and the ensuing brainstorming during 1-2 December at TK Palace Hotel among participants from the Muslim Attorney Centre Foundation (MAC), Duay Jai Group, Lahu Human Rights Network, Patani Human Rights Network, Relatives of Victims of Enforced Disappearance, and representatives from various governmental agencies who were there to learn and give their comments. The seven-page document in Thai containing the recommendations has been produced based on the input and submitted to the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Justice and the Director General of the Rights and Liberties Protection Department to ensure that the Bill will be written in response to the incumbent realities in Thailand. In summary, the recommendations are that;

1. An act of torture and enforced disappearance is often inflicted on certain vulnerable and marginalize populations including the ethnic groups, political dissidents such as human rights defenders or those living in area where special laws are imposed to, i.e., crack down on narcotic trafficking, suppress terrorism, or suppress influential persons, etc.

2. Attempts to investigate cases concerning torture and enforced disappearance have often been unsuccessful and no cases have been brought to the justice system. This could be attributed to that the competent authorities often fail to exercise their power independently and impartially, or are not keen on resolving the case or fail to carry out a prompt investigation as a result of the interference made by influential persons. It is therefore important that personnel designated with the mandate to carry out the investigation must have proven expertise and received proper training. They should be able to work professionally and independently in order to garner trust from the victims and their relatives.

3. The examination and treatment of victims of torture must be carried out by medical personnel and psychologists with specialized skills on torture examination. In this Bill, there should also be a framework to determine remediation including compensation and physical and mental rehabilitation and training on Manual on Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Istanbul Protocol) should be provided for all concerned officers including medical personnel.

4. In this Bill, a provision must be made to ensure that the case of enforced disappearance shall be promptly, impartially and effectively investigated in order to bring to justice the perpetrators even though the disappeared person even we could not be found and no part of his or her body. It must be recognized that the right to know the facts regarding the plight of the victim must be respected.

5. The current Bill still lacks effective and clear guidelines regarding witness protection. It should be made clear in the Bill that the officials designated to provide witness protection must not come from the same agency which has been accused of committing either the torture or enforced disappearance. This is to ensure that no perpetrator can influence witness protection mechanism.

6. The Bill is still made an exception to allow a denial of request by the relatives or other people for information in relation on holding a person in an undisclosed place, if the information could have given rise to harm to the person and hinder criminal investigation. Such concealment of information can contribute to risk of an act of torture and enforced disappearance. Such a waiver and restriction is conflicting to the absolute prohibition against torture and enforced disappearance and it should be reconsidered.

7. According to international law, a systematic act of torture and enforced disappearance constitutes a crime against humanity. Neither a waiver of punishment nor an amnesty can be offered even during the time an emergency situation is declared.

8. Access to legal support should be promoted among the victims and their relatives. Therefore, the Bill should spell out guidelines through which the persons can have access to help from the Justice Fund and to bring their cases to the Court. This will ensure access for all among the victims who want to pursue the justice process.

For more information, please contact

Angkhana Neelapaijit, JPF phone 084-7280350

Pornpen Khongkachonkiet , CrCF Phone 02-6934939

25571219-191109.jpg

25571219-191208.jpg

Read Full Post »

http://www.lepetitjournal.com/bangkok/societe/actualite/201926-cross-cultural-foundation-la-situation-des-droits-de-l-homme-en-thailande-etait-meilleure-au-debut-des-annees-2000-qu-aujourd-hui

On the occasion of the International Day of Human Rights ( 10 December 2014 ) , Ghislain Fishmonger met for Lepetitjournal.com Pornpen Khongkachonkiet ( Noi ) , director of the Thai Association Cross Cultural Foundation. This Thai strives daily to promote and protect human rights in the Kingdom and is concerned about the current situation

Thai born in Bangkok , I am 43 years old , single, no children . I am currently executive director of the association crosss Cultural Foundation. I work in the Thai association based in Bangkok since 2005. I work in the field of human rights, law and development for almost 15 years and have collaborated with Forum Asia . I hold a degree in social sciences from the University of Silapakorn and an MA in History from Thammasat University .

This is a non-governmental organization (NGO) that is Thai for the protection , promotion and evaluation of human rights in Thailand. While we work in partnership with other NGOs such as the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung Foundation , the Center of Muslim Lawyers , the Association for the Prevention of Torture , the International Federation of Human Rights , Amnesty International Thailand , the Union for Civil Liberty , and with institutional bodies such as the Committee on human Rights of ASEAN, that of Thailand , the High Commissioner for Refugees and the International Commission of Jurists.

But we are independent. The association was founded in 2002 , including Somchai Homlaor , a leading student movements against repression in 1973 and 1976 , became one of the most active advocates human rights of the kingdom during the 80s and 90s . He is a lawyer and now a member of the Committee on law reform.

What are the ways of your association?
They are modest. Our team consists of 5 persons at headquarters in Bangkok (one director , two administrative and two lawyers ) and we have correspondents in the field , or small local associations or local volunteers that we pay on time. Our annual budget is about 10 million baht . The funds come from the Thai institutions ( Ministry of Justice , Commission on Human Rights Committee of the Law Reform ) or foreign partners (embassies, UN , international programs , Open Society).

Our actions aimed at fighting against violations of fundamental rights of citizens , particularly in the Muslim south affected by armed conflict, but not only. We want to improve access to justice for citizens and there is still a great flexibility in this area in the kingdom.
For example , minorities who do not speak the Thai language or speak little ( mountain , tribes, southern Muslims , farmers, refugees, migrant workers, undocumented or stateless persons) are systematically discriminated against, particularly in cases of land dispute , agricultural, real estate, on the rights of their community or their social rights. These populations are present mainly in rural and border areas, but not only. Take the example of Cambodian or Burmese workers in the fishing industry : their rights are violated ; they have no right to social protection or labor law; their bosses are very rarely prosecuted both civil and criminal . These populations are also vulnerable in criminal cases , particularly when the perpetrators are members of government forces. Cross Cultural Foundation is striving to provide legal aid and assistance to these populations. Note role can be decisive because the Thai judicial system is very slow ( serious facts dating from 2004 and 2005 have still not been tried today) and difficult to prosecute public officials . So the victims are discouraged and no longer want to take legal action.

Sometimes we get from amicable arrangements during the proceedings that allow at least victims to obtain financial compensation ( illegal employment, abuse, non- payment of wages, damages for unlawful occupation or destruction illegal house) . A victim fund was effectively implemented by the government of Yingluck Shiwanatra .

Our association also encourages victims to defend themselves in court because the strong of Thai society ( people with political, economic or military) do not hesitate to bring charges against the victims who accuse , claims for defamation or dissemination false information. Overall, this leads to discouragement , especially Muslim populations in the South of Thailand : armed incidents , arbitrary arrests, ill-treatment or torture complaints of false accusations , slow pace of justice . All this leads to a great sense of impunity of the powerful and uselessness of justice.

It also organizes say education , information and support to other associations : We offer legal training or support for victims , for lawyers , legal professionals, legal advisors and write textbooks (eg on women’s rights , children’s rights ) . Finally , we carry out advocacy work : for example, we pleaded with the authorities to a deep reform of the police , justice and administration , with better dissemination of standards of human rights. We occasionally got some improvements.

We also conducted a working mobilization and advocacy for the abolition or easing of martial law applied in the Muslim south since 2004 and the Emergency Decree, which has been implemented since 2005. Martial law authorizes the military to detain a person for 7 days without presentation to a judge. Under the emergency decree , the extension of military detention is possible for a period of 30 days. This makes a total of six weeks of holding for without being brought before a judge without charge against you without access to a lawyer , your record , family or doctor . It was only after 6 weeks you are released or brought before a judge to hold a trial. This is a very dangerous law, in complete violation of international conventions ratified by the kingdom. We failed in our advocacy and we are seeing today national consequences today.

That is to say ? How do you connect the situation in the South and that prevailing in the country?
We fought for years for the end of the emergency legislation but people do not feel is not affected by this action. We were told that the situation of armed conflict justified these breaches of the law that the South had particular problems that required these exceptions. Geographical distance , the fact that the local population is Muslim and journalistic coverage sometimes caricatured fed indifference. We see this report today. The emergency legislation that has been ” tested ” and ” refined ” is now used throughout the country to restrict the fundamental rights of all Thais . Martial law which allows detention for seven days is now implemented at national level by the same soldiers who often served in the South and were promoted to national positions since because of their service . This trend is worrying for the future of the kingdom.
In the south, the administrative detention period was used by the police and the military to get information. But this has often led to the collection of misinformation and so after military mistakes, police and even criminal . In total , more than 10,000 people were arrested in this context in the South since 2004. Of course, as in any system without control abuses take place during this period of detention . There is clear evidence of torture and ill-treatment. More than 300 have been documented by us and the Association of Muslim Lawyers . And it is only those documented. There was surely more. This does not mean that the use of torture is common in the Thai army . It is chronic, however, in certain specific units , especially some task force in charge of intelligence, or in paramilitary groups. They attack sometimes journalists, community leaders, miners, defenders of human rights. The army, as a whole, tolerate such practices, or at least does not punish .

How do they react to the military involved allegations of torture and ill-treatment ?

The military suspected of committing such abuses do not just challenge the facts. They consider that it affects their reputation and , more generally, that of the army . Some are determined to act in retaliation. Defamation complaints were filed . Either we defend people , or our employees are directly threatened by these complaints. Cross Cultural Foundation and I are currently subject to a criminal defamation complaint filed in May 2014 by an officer of the paramilitary unit 4 deployed in the south unit that is mentioned in one of our reports to regularly committing abuses. I was heard by the police but no indictment at this stage. It is clear that beyond my personal case , it is to intimidate NGOs working in the field of human rights. If a trial is held , we risk up to two years imprisonment and a 200,000 baht fine.

25571210-172042.jpg

Read Full Post »

ศาสตรจารย์วิทิต มันตราภรณ์ นิติศาสตร์มหาวิทยาลัยจุฬาลงกรณ์
สิทธิในชีวิต การฆ่านอกระบบกฎหมาย บทบาทของตุลาการ
วันที่ 6 พฤศจิกายน 2557

วันนี้เราไม่มีผู้พิพากษาศาลทหาร ศาลปกครอง ศาลรัฐธรรมนูญในการประชุมของเรา ทำให้เราเห็นว่ามีความจำเป็นต้องรวมทุกฝ่ายเข้าด้วยเพื่อการนำไปสู่การคุ้มครองปกป้องสิทธิฯ

เวลาเราพูดถึงสิทธิในชีวิต การเสียชีวิตที่เกิดขึ้นนอกกรอบกฎหมาย แม้ในกรอบกฎหมายในนามของการประหารชีิวิต ก็ยังมีคำถามว่าเป็นการละเมิดสิทธิในชีวิตหรือไม่ เท่ากับว่าเรากำลังพูดถึง คำว่า blacklists, การตายในสถานที่ควบคุมตัวที่ต้องสงสัย การฆ่าในระหว่างความขัดแย้งทางการเมือง

สิทธิในชีวิต ได้รับการคุ้มครองตามกฎหมาย และไม่มีใครควรถูกพลากชีวิตไปโดยพลการ
ตอนนี้เราพูดถึงการประหารชีวิต ได้รับคำสั่งจากศาลว่าตัดสินโทษประหารชีวิต
ในไทยมีการประหารชีวิตตามกฎหมายตามคำสั่งศาล แต่ไทยเองก็ถูกวิพากษ์วิจารณ์ว่าการประหารชีวิตควรเป็นคดีที่เป็นอาชญกรรมที่ร้ายแรงที่ไม่ควรรวมการค้ายาหรือคดียาเสพติด ประเทศไทยก็ยังไม่มีการยุติโทษประหารชีวิตในคดียาเสพติด แม้ว่าจะยอมรับว่าคดียาเสพติดไม่ใช้คดีร้ายแรงที่สมสัดส่วนในการลงโทษโดยการประหารชีวิต

ในกติการะหว่างประเทศมีหลักการมากมายที่รับร้องสิทธิพื้นฐานนี้ ว่าไม่ควรมีใครถูกฆ่าตายหรือพลากชีวิตไปโดยพลการ

เช่น Code of conduct ระบุว่าจนท.ใช้กำลังได้ แต่ต้องใช้เมื่อจำเป็นเท่านั้น และใช้อย่างสมสัดส่วนและไม่เกินกว่าเหตุ แล้วก็ต้องใช้แนวทางที่ไม่ใช้อาวุธก่อนการใช้อาวุธ การยิงหรือการใช้อาวุธต้องดำเนินการเป็นไปตามขั้นตอน มีการเตือนก่อนว่าจะใช้ความรุนแรง กฎการใช้กำลังต้องสั่งอย่างเป็นทางการ มีระบบการสั่งการเป็นโครงสร้างที่ชัดเจนหรือไม่ หรือให้ใช้อาวุธบางประเภทก่อน แล้วค่อยใช้อาวุธปืนหรืออาวุธรุนแรงอืื่นๆ

การรับคำสั่งการอย่างชัดเจน clear chain of command, มีการแทรกแซงของตุลาการได้หากต้องมีการหยุดหรือห้ามไม่ให้ใช้กำลังไว้ก่อนในบางกรณี เราไม่สามารถส่งให้คนกลับประเทศไปเผชิญกับภัยประหัตประหาร เราต้องมีระบบการไต่สวนการตายหรือการทำการผ่าศพที่เป็นอิสระ และเราต้องการให้มีการชดเชยเยียวยาที่เหมาะสมในกรณีที่มีการละเมิดสิทธิในชีวิต

ถ้าไม่มีการเยียวยาชดเชยในประเทศก็ร้องเรียนผู้แทนพิเศษฯของยูเอ็นได้เพื่อเรียกร้องให้ยูเอ็นเรียกร้องรัฐนั้นๆ ให้ปฏิบัติตามในเรื่องการชดเชยเยียวยาการละเมิดสิทธิในชีวิต
การเรียกร้องสิทธิในการเยียวยาเกิดขึ้นได้ในประเทศโดยการนำคดีเข้าสุ่การพิจารณาในศาลได้หลายประเทศศาลพลเรือน ศาลทหาร ศาลปกครอง ศาลรัฐธรรมนูญ ใครควรขึ้นศาลไหน คดีไหนควรขึ้นศาลไหน ทหารก็ควรขึ้นศาลพลเรือนหาเป็นการกระทำการละเมิดสิทธิในชีวิต เพราะศาลคืออำนาจและอาจเกิดความไม่เป็นธรรม ต้องมีการตรวจสอบกันได้

การสอบสวนคดีการเสียชีวิตในการควบคุมตัวเราต้องเริ่มที่การเปลี่ยนภาระการพิสูจน์ให้เป็นของรัฐ ว่าไม่ได้มีการฆ่าหรือทำให้ตาย มีหลักฐานพยานอะไรที่พิสูจน์ว่า รัฐไม่ได้ทำ
แต่ตอนนี้เรายังใช้วิธีการพิสูจน์ความผิดประเภทนี้แบบอาญาปกติ ให้ญาติพิสูจน์ว่ามีการทำให้ตายในการควบคุมตัว ซึ่งยากมากในบริบทของเรา

มีความท้าทายใหม่ๆ อีกมากมาย ด้วยเช่น การใช้ drones ทำให้เกิดการตาย ที่ไม่จำเป็นหรือไม่ (unnecessary suffering) เป็นการละเมิดสิทธิในชีวิตหรือเปล่า หรือการมีหุ่นยนต์ที่ฆ่าคนได้ไม่ใช่มีแค่ในหนังแล้ว

minisota principle: protocal เรื่อง Burden of proves
ถ้ามีการคำสารภาพของทหารหรือจนท. เราก็สามารถปรับแนวคิดเรื่องการเปลี่ยนภาระการพิสูจน์

ก้าวต่อไป
1. ป้องกันเหตุ
2. ปกป้อง
3. ความรับผิดทางคดี
4. remediation ไม่ใช่แค่เงินค่าชดเชยแต่หมายถึงสิทธิในการรับรู้ความจริง การได้รับคำขอโทษ หรือการยืนยันว่าจะไม่เกิดขึ้นอีก

25571106-131920.jpg

Read Full Post »

> English > News and Events > DisplayNews
9 9 Google +1

Committee against Torture marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Convention against Torture

Committee against Torture

4 November 2014

The Committee against Torture marked today the thirtieth anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, hearing an address by the High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein and a message from United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon. The Committee also held two panel discussions, one on the promotion of the universal ratification of the Convention and another on the implementation of the Convention by States parties.

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, High Commissioner for Human Rights, in his opening remarks said that the Convention against Torture was possibly the most comprehensive and powerful existing instrument of international law but despite the progress, every day and on every continent, women, men and children were deliberately and atrociously tortured by State agents. He stressed continuing challenges to the implementation of the Convention, including the use of unprecedentedly brutal violence against targeted ethnic and religious groups by non-State armed groups and the grim human rights situation of migrants. The Committee should continue its exemplary work in adapting the Convention’s norms to new forms of torture and ill-treatment, including gender-based violence, domestic violence, female genital mutilation and trafficking.

In his message, Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon said that torture continued across the world with devastating impact on individuals and societies, and stressed the crucial role of civil society in fulfilling the objectives of the Convention against Torture. States should take meaningful steps to eradicate torture and rehabilitate victims; governments had the duty to protect and not oppress people and torture had no place in the society the United Nations was striving to build.

Claudio Grossman, Committee Chairperson, said that all States should ratify the Convention against Torture and should not forget that the absolute prohibition of torture was a norm of customary law. Much remained to be done and the Committee against Torture was particularly concerned about the continuing reports of reprisals against individuals who engaged with treaty bodies.

Essadia Belmir, Committee Vice-Chairperson and moderator of the panel on promoting the universal ratification of the Convention, said that States must overcome their hesitance to ratify the Convention against Torture without reservations and enter into a constructive dialogue with the Committee. It was important to highlight the importance of the Convention against Torture Initiative which encouraged States to ratify the Convention and assisted them in overcoming technical obstacles.

The panellists were Juan Mendez, Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, who addressed the panel in a video message; Carsten Staur, Permanent Representative of Denmark to the United Nations Office at Geneva; Emmanuel Decaux, Chairperson of the Committee on Enforced Disappearances; and Mathew Sands, Legal Adviser, Association for the Prevention of Torture.

Felice Gaer, Committee Vice-chairperson and moderator of the panel discussion on the implementation of the Convention by States parties, said that the challenge today was how to enforce the Convention. Over the years, the Committee had adopted a number of general comments which focused on the implementation of the provisions of the Convention and its Optional Protocol. General comments dealt with issues such as the obligation of States to incorporate the definition of torture in national legislation and investigate all allegations of torture and punish those found guilty, as well as gender-based violence and the seeking of redress by victims of gender-based violence, female genital mutilation, and trafficking.

The panellists in the discussion on the implementation of the Convention by States parties were Mohamed Aujjar, Permanent Representative of Morocco to the United Nations Office at Geneva; Milos Jankovic, Member of the Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture; Mauro Palma, former President of the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture; and Gerald Staberock, Secretary-General of the World Organization Against Torture.

In concluding remarks, Mr. Grossman thanked the panellists, Committee Experts and civil society representatives who had enriched the dialogue today and noted the extraordinary value of the provision in the Convention which allowed individuals to file claims against their States.

Speaking in the discussion today were Brazil, United States, Argentina, Guatemala, France, Germany, Switzerland and China.

The following non-governmental organizations spoke: the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims and the Centre for Civil and Political Rights.

The next public meeting of the Committee will be held at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 5 November, when it will start its consideration of the sixth periodic report of Ukraine (CAT/C/UKR/6).

Opening Statements

ZEID RA’AD AL HUSSEIN, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, said that 30 years ago the international community, confronted with terrible violations of human rights by military dictatorships, had adopted the Convention against Torture, possibly the most comprehensive and powerful existing instrument of international law. It had strengthened the recognition that torture was a crime so repugnant that its prohibition must be a fundamental norm of international law, binding all States without exception, and it remained one of the few unequivocal obligations that the international community had embraced. The Convention had also established the legal definition of torture and the steps the States must take to eliminate it. Despite the progress made, every day and on every continent, women, men and children were deliberately and atrociously tortured by State agents.

New forms of torture and ill-treatment continued to challenge the Convention: non-State armed groups were using unprecedentedly brutal violence against targeted ethnic and religious groups, and it was essential that accountability for gross human rights violations was established in order to avoid repetition. Secondly, the human rights situation of migrants around the globe was increasingly grim; it was encouraging that the Committee had consistently applied the Convention to those situations and had held that asylum seekers and undocumented migrants should never be detained, or if at all, only as a measure of last resort. Other contemporary forms of torture and ill-treatment included gender-based violence, domestic violence, female genital mutilation and trafficking, and the Committee should continue its exemplary work in adapting the Convention’s norms to such practices and helping victims seek remedies for the injustices they had faced.

BAN KI-MOON, United Nations Secretary-General, in a written message read out by IBRAHIM SALAMA, Director of the Human Rights Treaty Division, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, said that torture continued across the world with devastating impact on individuals and societies. Civil society played a crucial role in fulfilling the objectives of the Convention and the Secretary-General called on States to meet their reporting obligations to the Committee against Torture and take meaningful steps to eradicate torture and rehabilitate victims. Governments had the duty to protect and not oppress people and torture had no place in the society the United Nations was striving to build.

CLAUDIO GROSSMAN, Chairperson of the Committee, in his opening remarks, thanked the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the United Nations Secretary-General and acknowledged the contribution of the Committee Experts to the achievement of the goals of the Convention. Thirty years after the adoption of the Convention, 156 States had ratified the instrument, while positive changes in a number of countries occurred as a result of the consideration of State parties’ reports and the issuance of the Committee’s concluding observations; those changes included the ratification of the Optional Protocol by some countries and the abolition of the death penalty in others. All States should ratify the Convention and should not forget that the absolute prohibition of torture was a norm of customary law. Much remained to be done and the Committee was particularly concerned about the continuing reports of reprisals against individuals who engaged with the Committee. The Committee had undertaken a number of steps to prevent reprisals, including the appointment of a Rapporteur on reprisals, and stressed that it had zero tolerance in dealing with reprisals.

Panel One: Promoting the Universal Ratification of the Convention

Presentation by the Panellists

ESSADIA BELMIR, Vice-Chairperson of the Committee and panel moderator, called on the remaining 39 States to ratify the Convention. Unfortunately, torture and ill-treatment continued and it was the most vulnerable among peoples who were the victims; it was important to state that torture affected not only the victims but also the society that tolerated it. States must overcome their hesitance to ratify the Convention without reservations and enter into a constructive dialogue with the Committee against Torture. It was important to highlight the importance of the Initiative on the Convention against Torture which encouraged States to ratify the Convention and assist them in overcoming technical obstacles.

JUAN MENDEZ, Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, in a video message, stressed that the universal ratification of the Convention had not yet been achieved and it was a question of great concern that torture and ill-treatment had not yet been eradicated, including in the context of the fight against terrorism. The Special Rapporteur expressed his full support to the Convention against Torture Initiative and said that the thirtieth anniversary of the Convention must be used to reinvigorate the commitment and the efforts to eradicate torture. It was important to understand obstacles to the absolute prohibition of torture, and for that a multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder approach must be applied.

CARSTEN STAUR, Permanent Representative of Denmark to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said that the prohibition of the use of torture was absolute and that there were no exemptions; it was prohibited in all circumstances, including in a state of conflict or public emergency. The universal ratification of the Convention must be achieved and it was important to understand why some countries hesitated to make this commitment. The Convention against Torture Initiative aimed at universal ratification and implementation of the Convention against Torture within the next 10 years and worked to create renewed attention to the Convention and initiate a dialogue with countries that had still not ratified it. The universal implementation of the prohibition of torture would require a very strong focus on the legal sector in each country over the coming years; police, prosecutors, courts and prisons would largely be at the centre. It would be a major challenge, but the fight against torture was at the heart of the protection of personal integrity and safety, and at the core of their relations with authorities and governments as such.

EMMANUEL DECAUX, Chairperson of the Committee on Enforced Disappearances, said that some 30 States members of the United Nations still were not party to or had not ratified the Convention. Since the Vienna Conference the incentives to ratify the Convention had multiplied and recently the Human Rights Council had introduced a double mechanism to spur ratification of core human rights instruments as a requirement to obtain a seat on the Council. It was not enough to aim for universal ratification of the Convention but to strive to its effective implementation.

MATHEW SANDS, Legal Adviser, Association for the Prevention of Torture, spoke on behalf of MARK THOMSON, Secretary-General of the Association for the Prevention of Torture, saying that governments bore the ultimate responsibility for ensuring international obligations to prevent torture and to address its effects, but it was often civil society organizations which raised awareness of such obligations and which contributed to efforts aimed at ending the practice of torture. The Convention against Torture provided States with detailed provisions which described the essential aspects of effective torture prevention, prohibition, punishment and redress; its ratification demonstrated the willingness of States to end torture and it promoted good governance, the rule of law and security through a system of accountability and international review. Ratification of the Convention against Torture was an important first step in the process to end practices that led to ill-treatment and torture and one which brought with it a number of key benefits.

LAWRENCE MURUGU MUTE, Chairperson of the Committee for the Prevention of Torture in Africa, provided his contribution in writing.

Discussion

Brazil said that it had in place policies on freedom from torture and in 1989 had acceded to the Convention and had created a national system for the prevention and eradication of torture in line with its international obligations. United States said that the Convention against Torture was a core international human rights treaty and affirmed the essential principle that under no circumstances was torture allowed. Argentina had prohibited torture in domestic legislation and said it was vital that States accepted regional and international supervisory mechanisms, including for places of detention. Guatemala was aware of the challenges ahead in the full compliance with the provisions of the Convention against Torture and asked all States to support the important Convention against Torture Initiative. France welcomed the remarkable work done by the Committee and said that combating torture was its priority; torture could not be justified under any circumstances and France would continue to work on its universal prohibition. Germany said it was now time to renew the commitment to combating torture which remained a scourge worldwide, and encouraged States which had not yet done so to ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture. The fight against torture was a priority of the human rights policy of Switzerland which remained committed to working towards the universal ratification and effective implementation of the Convention against Torture throughout the world.

Panel Two: Implementation of the Convention by States Parties

Presentation by the Panellists

FELICE GAER, Committee Vice-chairperson and panel moderator, said that the challenge today was how to enforce the Convention; the Committee had adopted a number of general comments which focused on the implementation of the provisions of the Convention and its Optional Protocol. States should incorporate the definition of torture in national legislation, investigate all allegations of torture and punish those found guilty. General comments also addressed the issue of gender-based violence and stated the fact that rules of evidence and procedure must afford equal weight to the testimony of women. The Committee also stated that victims of gender-based violence, female genital mutilation, and trafficking could also come forward and seek redress.

MOHAMED AUJJAR, Permanent Representative of Morocco to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said that the presence of Morocco in the core group of the Convention against Torture Initiative was an additional pledge of the unequivocal and irreversible commitment that Morocco took for the effective promotion and protection of human rights in the context of a strategic vision and a democratic and authentic societal project that placed the preservation of the dignity of the human being and citizen at the centre of the action of the State. In 2013, Morocco decided to accede to the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and its ratification had spurred a profound reflection about the appropriate national preventive mechanism. The National Human Rights Council was fully involved in combating torture and played the role of the national preventive mechanism.

MILOS JANKOVIC, Member of the Subcommittee on the Prevention of Torture, said that the Convention against Torture was exclusively concerned with the eradication of torture and ill-treatment and strived to ensure that all of the 156 States parties of the Convention exercised full jurisdiction over the acts of torture. Countries had clear obligations to investigate all acts of torture and ill-treatment even in the absence of a claim; ending impunity for torture and providing redress to victims was a crucial obligation of each State. Although it had been 30 years since the adoption of the Convention, detainees still faced a number of deficiencies in the procedural safeguards relevant for their protection against torture and ill-treatment. Effective medical and forensic documentation could bring evidence of torture and other ill-treatment to light so that perpetrators might be held accountable, stressed Mr. Jankovic and added that the burdensome lack of resources in the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights prevented the Subcommittee on the Prevention of Torture from conducting field visits and so implementing its mandate.

MAURO PALMA, former President of the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture, said that over the past 25 years the field of the Committee’s actions had expanded considerably, also due to the increased number of modalities of deprivation of liberty by a public authority. In their fight against international terrorism, more and more States adopted measures focussed on prolonged police custody, closed their eyes on incommunicado detention in secret places and implemented the expulsion of terrorist suspects to so-called torture countries under diplomatic assurances, so reopening the Pandora’s box and questioning the absoluteness of the prohibition of torture. The preventive system of bodies established at different levels were doing an excellent job to keep this trend under control, but were facing a number of challenges, including the tendency towards less transparent procedures, operations and detentions in the context of the international fight against terrorism, which hindered the positive responsibility of law enforcement officers. Because the credibility of the preventive action against torture was undermined, each time allegations of torture or ill-treatment were not properly investigated and those responsible were not held to account for their actions, impunity for law enforcement officials increased.

GERALD STABEROCK, Secretary-General of the World Organization Against Torture, took up the issue of the implementation gap from the point of view of civil society and took great courage in how civil society had developed over the past 30 years. Torture had many facets but was always a result of policies and laws, which meant that it could be eradicated; the key elements of eradication were a strong legal framework, safeguards and transparency, but the law alone was not sufficient if it did not change the culture of torture – a qualitative change of law must happen. The question of changing institutional cultures and ensuring accountability were of crucial importance and were inter-connected. Nothing prevented better than knowing that there would be sanctions. Re-focusing on accountability required clear political will and commitment, ethical prosecutorial responsibility, and a sea change in the way one looked at accountability and seeing accountability as something positive. Also needed was more evidence-based research on why investigations were hardly ever successful, on factors that impeded investigations and on innovative independent mechanisms of investigations.

Discussion

The International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims said that there was an increased focus on putting the victim at the centre of discussion, but action was still missing; the Committee should consider ways to promote the rehabilitation of victims, and ensure that its work was informed by their experiences. China said that it had made important efforts since it had ratified the Convention in 1989 and had made sustained progress in legislation and guaranteeing human rights, justice and institutionalizing civil rights. Centre for Civil and Political Rights raised a number of questions, including the implementation of the Committee’s concluding observations and the adoption of an assessment method to track the implementation.

A Member of Parliament of Uganda and a representative of the National Preventive Mechanism of Torture of Paraguay addressed the meeting in a video message.

Concluding Remarks

CLAUDIO GROSSMAN, Committee Chairperson, thanked the panellists, Committee Experts and civil society representatives who had enriched the dialogue today and noted the extraordinary value of the provision in the Convention that allowed individuals to file claims against their States.

– See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15249&LangID=E#sthash.aImvMQX4.dpuf

25571105-184558.jpg

Read Full Post »

http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/Treaties/CAT/Shared%20Documents/THA/INT_CAT_NGO_THA_17098_E.pdf

Read Full Post »

ทำไมการซ้อมทรมานเพื่อบังคับให้สารภาพปัจจุบันจึงไม่มีบาดแผล

1. การทรมานมักเกิดขึ้นก่อนการเข้าสู่กระบวนการยุติธรรมที่มีหลักการว่าต้องมีทนายร่วมรับฟังการสอบสวน

การทรมานมักเกิดขึ้นในบริบทใหม่ที่จนท. อ้างว่า “ซักถาม” เช่น เรียกผู้ต้องสงสัยมาถาม เรียกมาให้ข้อมูล โดยไม่มีการตั้งข้อหา

ในช่วงเวลาดังกล่าว
ไม่มีพยานเป็นบุคคลภายนอก นอกจากจนท.กับผู้ต้องสงสัย
สถานที่เกิดเหตุไม่ใช่สถานที่ราชการ มักเป็นห้องพักโรงแรม ในรถตู้ หรือบนรถ ระหว่างการเดินทาง
จึงไม่มีหลักฐานว่าผู้ต้องสงสัยอยู่ในการควบคุมตัวของจนท.
เป็นการควบคุมตัวนอกกฎหมาย

2. รูปแบบการทรมานที่ไม่ปรากฎบาดแผลตามเนื้อตัวร่างกายถูกนำมาใช้อย่างกว้างขวางเช่น
การขู่ให้กลัว ขู่จะฆ่า
การสร้างสถานการณ์ใกล้เคียงกับความตาย เช่น ขู่ว่าจะถ่วงน้ำ โยนลงจากฮอลิคับเตอร์
การยิงปืนใส่ข้างหู
การขู่ว่าจะใช้ไฟฟ้าซ๊อด (โดยมีอุปกรณ์อยู่ข้างๆ )
การใช้ถุงพลาสติกคลุมหัวเพื่อให้ขาดอากาศหายใจ (บางกรณีมีการกัดให้ขาดได้ แต่ก็กระทำหลายๆ ครั้ง หรือใส่ถุงพลาสติกหลายชั้น)
การใช้ผ้าปิดหน้าแล้วนำน้ำมารดให้เหมือนจมน้ำ (water boarding)
การปิดตาตลอดระยะเวลาการ “ซักถาม” ก่อนนำตัวเข้าสู่กระบวนการยุติธรรม หรือ “การสอบสวน”
การบังคับให้ออกกำลังกายหลายร้อยครั้งเช่น ยืนนั่ง วิดพื้น เดินขึ้นลง และอื่นๆ

รูปแบบการทรมานทางร่างกายมักเกิดขึ้นในล่มผ้า ด้วยอุปกรณ์ที่ปกปิดเพื่อไม่ให้เกิดร่องรอย เช่น ไม้พันด้วยผ้า ตีหรือทุบบริเวณช่องท้องหรือหน้าอกจะไม่ปรากฎบาดแผลด้านนอกแต่เกิดด้านใน การใช้หมวกกั้นน๊อคของนักมวย และใช้นวมชกมวยเป็นอุปกรณ์ในการทำร้าย เป็นต้น

บาดแผลช้ำภายในไม่สามารถมองได้ด้วยตาเปล่าแม้จะยังมีอาการเจ็บอยู่ ต้องตรวจรักษาและบันทึกโดยแพทย์ผู้เชี่ยวชาญประกอบกับการสัมภาษณ์เชิงลิึกถึงประสบการณ์การทรมานและลักษณะการจับกุมควบคุมตัวบุคคล การxray บาทแผลลักษณะเช่นนี้ในเวลาหลังเกิดเหตุการณ์ 5, 10, 20 วันให้ผลที่แตกต่างกันมาก การxray อาจไม่ให้ผลการถ่ายภาพกล้้ามเนื้อที่อักเสบได้เมื่อเวลาผ่านไปแล้วเนินนาน ยกเว้นกรณีมีกระดูกหัก เป็นต้น

3.การตรวจเย่ี่ยมและการตรวจรักษาโดยบุคคลกรทางการแพทย์ที่เป็นอิสระต่อเหยื่อเป็นไปได้โดยยาก

การร้องเรียนการทรมานของเหยื่อเป็นไปโดยยาก ไม่สามารถร้องเรียนได้ กลัว ไม่มีผู้ไว้วางใจ ตำรวจไม่รับแจ้งความ เป็นต้น
การร้องเรียนต่อหน่วยงานอิสระ หรือหน่วยที่เหนือขึ้นไปแม้เกิดขึ้น แต่การดำเนินการเพื่อเข้าถึงและการตรวจเย่ี่ยมและการตรวจรักษาโดยบุคคลกรทางการแพทย์ที่เป็นอิสระต่อเหยื่อเป็นไปได้โดยยาก

โดย พรเพ็ญ คงขจรเกียรติ

Read Full Post »

English version is below
ใบแจ้งข่าว

สองผู้ต้องหาพม่าคดีเกาะเต่า ยื่นหนังสือผ่านตัวแทนสภาทนายความ ร้องขอความเป็นธรรมต่อพนักงานอัยการจังหวัดเกาะสมุย ปฏิเสธไม่ได้ฆ่าหรือข่มขืนนักท่องเที่ยวชาวอังกฤษ ระบุถูกเจ้าหน้าที่ซ้อมให้รับสารภาพ

เมื่อวันที่ 20 ตุลาคม พ.ศ. 2557 คณะกรรมการสิทธิมนุษยชน สภาทนายความ ได้แต่งตั้งคณะทำงานเพื่อให้ความช่วยเหลือคดีที่ผู้ต้องหาชาวพม่าสองราย นาย วิน หรือเนวิน และนายซอ ถูกตั้งข้อหาในคดีอาญา จากเหตุการณ์ฆาตกรรมสองนักท่องเที่ยวชาวอังกฤษ นายเดวิด มิลเลอร์ วัย 24 ปี และนางสาวฮันนาห์ วิทเธอริดจ์ วัย 23 ปี ที่เกาะเต่า จังหวัดสุราษฎร์ธานี เหตุเกิดเมื่อวันที่ 15 กันยายน พ.ศ.2557 โดยมีนายสุรพงษ์ กองจันทึก เป็นหัวหน้าคณะทำงานช่วยเหลือคดีและประเด็นอื่นๆที่อาจจะเกี่ยวข้องกับการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชนของผู้ต้องหาในคดีอาญา โดยมีทนายความอาวุโสจำนวนหนึ่งร่วมเป็นคณะทำงานดังกล่าวด้วย

ความคืบหน้าล่าสุด วันที่ 21 ตุลาคม พ.ศ. 2557 ทนายความของคณะทำงานดังกล่าวได้เข้าพบผู้ต้องหาเพื่อสอบข้อเท็จจริง โดยทางเรือนจำอำเภอเกาะสมุยได้จัดพื้นที่ให้คณะทนายความได้พูดคุยกับผู้ต้องหาได้อย่างเป็นอิสระ การสอบข้อเท็จจริงใช้ระยะเวลากว่า 5 ชั่วโมง และผู้ต้องหาทั้งสองรายได้ร้องขอให้ทีมทนายความยื่นคำร้อง เพื่อขอความเป็นธรรมต่อพนักงานอัยการจังหวัดเกาะสมุย โดยปฏิเสธข้อกล่าวหาของพนักงานสอบสวนที่ว่าตนมีส่วนเกี่ยวข้องกับการข่มขืนและการฆาตกรรมนักท่องเที่ยวชาวอังกฤษ สาเหตุที่ตนให้การรับสารภาพนั้น เนื่องจากระหว่างการถูกควบคุมตัวโดยเจ้าหน้าที่ตำรวจ ผู้ต้องหาทั้งสองได้ถูกเจ้าหน้าที่บางคนและล่ามของเจ้าหน้าที่ ร่วมกันกระทำการทรมานเพื่อให้รับสารภาพในวันที่ 2 ตุลาคม 2557 จากนั้นนพักงานตำรวจจึงได้ขอให้ศาลออกหมายจับและนำผู้ต้องหาทั้งสองลงพื้นที่เกิดเหตุเพื่อจัดทำแผนประกอบคำรับสารภาพในวันที่ 3 ตุลาคม 2557 ซึ่งได้มีข่าวปรากฎแพร่หลายตามสื่อโทรทัศน์ สื่อสิ่งพิมพ์และสื่อออนไลน์ การยื่นคำร้องขอความเป็นธรรมต่อพนักงานอัยการครั้งนี้ เพื่อขอให้พนักงานอัยการดำเนินการสอบสวนเพิ่มเติมในประเด็นเรื่องการบังคับให้ผู้ต้องหารับสารภาพและสอบสวนพยานของผู้ต้องหาประกอบด้วย ทั้งนี้เพื่อให้เกิดความเป็นธรรมและนำผู้กระทำความผิดที่แท้จริงเข้าสู่กระบวนการยุติธรรมต่อไป

ทั้งนี้ในกระบวนการพิจารณาคดีที่เป็นธรรม นำคนผิดมาลงโทษตามกฎหมายนั้นก็เพื่อให้เกิดความเป็นธรรมต่อผู้เสียหายในคดีอาญา ญาติของผู้เสียหาย และต่อผู้ที่ตกเป็นผู้ต้องหาในคดีอาญา เพื่อให้แน่ใจว่าผู้กระทำความผิดอาญานั้นได้รับโทษตามสมควรแก่ความผิดที่ได้กระทำและเพื่อเป็นมาตรการมิให้ผู้กระทำความผิดลอยนวลหรืออยู่เหนือกฎหมาย อันจะสร้างความหวาดกลัว ความไม่ปลอดภัย ต่อคดีอาชญากรรมที่สร้างความสะเทือนขวัญให้กับประชาชนในสังคม เช่น เหตุการณ์ฆาตกรรมในพื้นที่เกาะเต่า ซึ่งมีผู้เสียหายเป็นนักท่องเที่ยวชาวอังกฤษ และมีผู้ถูกกล่าวหาเป็นแรงงานข้ามชาติสัญชาติพม่า ซึ่งเจ้าหน้าที่ที่เกี่ยวข้องกับกระบวนการยุติธรรมทางอาญาในประเทศไทยมีหน้าที่หลักโดยตรงในการติดตามหาผู้กระทำความผิดมาลงโทษตามกระบวนการยุติธรรมที่มาตรฐานทางกฎหมายอาญาทั้งภายในและระหว่างประเทศได้รับรองไว้ ทั้งในขั้นตอนก่อนการพิจารณา เช่น ในการสืบสวน การจับกุม ควบคุมตัวเพื่อทำการสอบสวน ในระหว่างการพิจารณาคดีของศาล กระบวนการรับฟังพยานหลักฐาน รวมถึงการคุมขังผู้ต้องหาหรือจำเลยระหว่างการพิจารณาคดี อันเป็นมาตรการป้องกันมิให้เกิดการละเมิดกฎหมายหรือหลักการด้านสิทธิมนุษยชนของผู้ที่ตกเป็นผู้ต้องหา

อนึ่งจากการเยี่ยมโดยคณะทำงานและตัวแทนองค์กรภาคประชาสังคม พบว่าผู้ต้องหาในคดีนี้ได้ถูกใส่โซ่ตรวนไว้ตลอด 24 ชั่วโมง ทั้งในขณะที่ผู้ต้องหาถูกขังอยู่ในเรือนจำและระหว่างที่เดินทางมายังศาล ซึ่งศาลปกครองเคยมีคำพิพาษาเพื่อสร้างบรรทัดฐานด้านการตรวนผู้ต้องขังตลอด 24 ชั่วโมงนั้น ย่อมเป็นการละเมิดสิทธิของผู้ต้องขัง

คดีดังกล่าวนี้ นับว่าเป็นที่สนใจของประชาชนทั้งในประเทศไทยและในต่างประเทศ มูลนิธิเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนและการพัฒนา (Human Rights and Development Foundation-HRDF) เครือข่ายเพื่อสิทธิแรงงานข้ามชาติ (Migrant Workers Rights Network-MRWRN) มูลนิธิการศึกษาเพื่อการพัฒนา (Foundation of Education and Development-FED) และมูลนิธิผสานวัฒนธรรม (Cross Cultural Foundation-CrCF) ซึ่งเป็นองค์กรพัฒนาเอกชน มีวัตถุประสงค์ในการส่งเสริมให้ประชาชนเข้าถึงความเป็นธรรม ตามกระบวนการยุติธรรม หลักนิติธรรม และหลักสิทธิมนุษยชน ขอให้การสนับสนุนการทำงานของสภาทนายความและรณรงค์เพื่อให้เกิดการความยุติธรรม ยุติการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชน เพื่อให้ประชาชนมีความเชื่อมั่นต่อกระบวนการยุติธรรม หลักนิติธรรม ในประเทศไทย

For Immediate Release 22 October 2014

Press Release

Two Burmese Koh Tao Suspects Recant Confessions, due to the use of Torture, to Koh Samui Provincial Public Attorney through the Lawyer Council of Thailand, Deny the Rape and Murder Charges of the British Tourists

20th October 2014, The Human Rights Commission of the Lawyer Council of Thailand set up a working group to provide legal aid to Win or Win Saw Thun and Zaw Lin, the two Burmese suspects in the murder of David Miller, 24 and the rape and murder of Hannah Witheridge, 23 in Koh Tao, Surat Thani province on 15 September 2014. Mr Surapong Kong-janteuk has been appointed as the head of the the mission to provide legal aid and other assistance regarding human rights violation in criminal legal procedure along with several other senior attorneys.

On 21st October 2014, attorneys from the above working group has met and conducted a fact-finding mission with the two suspects. Koh Samui Prison has arranged a meeting room for the suspects to have a private and confidential meeting and for fact-finding with the attorneys for over five hours. The two suspects requested their attorneys to lodge a petition to the public attorney of Koh Samui Province. The suspects have denied the charges associated with the murder and rape of the two British tourists and said they had been forced to confess under the police custody. Additionally, they said to be tortured by some of police officials and the official’s interpreter in order to extract confessions on 2nd October 2014. Afterwards, the police official had requested the arrest warrants and had directed the suspects to the crime scene reenactment on 3rd October 2014. The reenactment has been covered by various media such as on televisions, printed media and online media. The complaint is sought to seek a further investigation by the public attorney into the use of torture to obtain the confessions and to accept the suspects’s witnesses in order to ensure justice and to bring the real perpetrators to the judicial process.

Under the principle of fair trial, a perpetrator must be brought to the judicial process under the law to achieve justice for victims of the crime, their relatives and to those accused of crimes. A perpetrator of a criminal offence must receive a proportionate punishment to an offence committed to avoid impunity, which will instil fear and insecurities due to the serious criminal offence among the public. In the case of Koh Tao murder where the victims are two British tourists, there are two Burmese migrants accused of the crime. The Thai officials involved with the criminal justice system are responsible to identify the offender to be punished under the criminal justice system under the domestic law and international laws Thailand has ratified. Thus, Thailand must follow the procedure during the pre-trial process, such as in an investigation, an arrest, a pre-trial detention, an interrogation, during a trial, a witness examination, a detention of an accused or a defendant during the trial to prevent violations of the law or an abuse of human rights to the accused.

The civil society organization working group and representatives also noted that the two suspects are shackled 24 hrs a day, when they were in the prison and while they are travelling to the court of justice. In this case, the Administrative Court issued a verdict that 24 hrs shackling is a violation of a prisoner’s right.

As the Koh Tao murder case is under the local and international spotlight, the Human Rights and Development Foundation (HRDF) the Migrant Workers Rights Network (MWRN), the Foundation of Education and Development (FED) and the Cross Cultural Foundation (CrCF), who are NGOs to support an access to justice under the judicial process, the rule of law and human rights, would like to express our support to the Lawyer Council of Thailand’s mission. We will jointly campaign for justice and to end human rights violations to ensure that people will trust in the Thai judicial process and the rule of law in Thailand.

————————————————————————————————–

For more information, please contact

Mr. Surapong Kong-janteuk, Lawyer Council of Thailand representative 081 642 4006 or

Mr Nakorn Chompuchart 081 847 3086

————————————————————————————————–

รายละเอียดเพิ่มเติมติดต่อ

ข้อมูลเพิ่มเติม ติดต่อผู้แทนทนายความ สภาทนายความ นายสุรพงษ์ กองจันทึก 081 642 4006 หรือ

นายนคร ชมพูชาติ 081 847 3086

25571022-130736.jpg

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,460 other followers